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Zepatier beats Harvoni, Sovaldi in hep C clinical-data safety showdown: Advera Health Analytics

February 24, 2016 | By

It's still early days for Merck's hep C combo Zepatier, but the drug could be a frontrunner in terms of safety. In a new data analysis, Zepatier turned up proportionally fewer serious side effects than Gilead Sciences' hep C combo treatment Harvoni and its veteran hep C med Sovaldi.

SolvaldiHealthcare informatics firm Advera Health Analytics looked at clinical trial data for the three drugs and found that while Harvoni and Sovaldi's labels have worrisome side effects such as cardiac arrest and suicidal ideation, Zepatier does not have the same side effects listed. Zepatier is less risky than Sovaldi, according to Advera's report, but the drug's safety is on par with Harvoni, Advera said.

Zepatier and Harvoni worked almost equally well in treating individuals in clinical trials who had already undergone treatment. Harvoni was more effective than Zepatier and Sovaldi in patients who hadn't been treated previously, though, according to the report.

CVS: One In 12 Hepatitis C Patients Not Adhering To $1,000/Day Pill

I am currently receiving nearly one email a day from people who have used Sovaldi who have either relapsed or have what are described as serious continuous negative side effects.

These side effect range from sight impairment, serious nonstop headaches, extremely low platelets, pancreatitis, shacking, very similar to Parkinson’s disease, dry and breaking nails, dry hair, so dry that it cannot be corrected. Some have told me there hair started turning gray half way thru treatment and started falling out. The list goes on.

Most however become non detected but with some brutal side effects never mentioned in any of the trials. I believe that this is due to the fact that when selecting individuals for the trials they only select the healthiest people. I have seen this in my practice, only the healthiest people are selected, ones with some difficulties, even slight problems, they are left out.

The main groups that I see that are relapsing are people who used Pegasus and Peg intron and people with advanced cirrhosis. It seems so far that people who used interferon Alfa 2 B only do well and people who have used my program and never used interferon do far better.

Gilead sure painted a picture  of a complete cure, no problems, only $ 1000 a pill and they gracefully left out the negatives. Certainly nothing seen yet as horrible as interferon but there may be some serious issues.

In health,
Lloyd Wright

Health Canada approves dandelion extract trials in humans

Health Canada has approved early clinical trials of dandelion extract to see if it can be used to kill cancer.

The approval is for a phase one — or toxicology — trial. It will determine whether the body can tolerate the dandelion extract and, if it can, how much of the extract the human body can tolerate.

Phase one trials do not reveal whether the substance being tested has a medicinal effect.

Turmeric can help regenerate the liver, groundbreaking new research

(NaturalNews) Incredible, groundbreaking new research just published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand found that the primary polyphenol in turmeric - curcumin - is able to repair and even regenerate the liver tissues in diabetic rats.

Researchers at the Srinakharinwirot University in Bangkok administered curcumin to rats afflicted with diabetes and whose livers demonstrated the characteristic pathology and destruction of tissues and microvasculature. The curcumin was able to trigger a significant reversal of the condition.

What Experts are Saying About Quercetin

“Indicators suggest quercetin may help performance in athletes and may help also improve our cognitive performance, or brain alertness. I strongly encourage you to look into quercetin.”

Dr. Daniel Johnston
Preventive Medicine, Department of Defense, US Military, Comprehensive Soldier Fitness

The Most Epic Drug Failure. Ever.

By Dr. Mercola

Only a week after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advised all U.S. baby boomers to get tested for hepatitis C because it’s suspected that millions may be infected with it, a drug company with a hepatitis C treatment in the pipeline has suddenly abandoned the drug’s trials.

BMS Halts Hep C Drug Work After Patient Dies

Bristol-Myers Squibb announced late Thursday that it's stopping development of an investigational drug for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after a patient died of heart failure and eight others were hospitalized.

The drug, an HCV nucleotide polymerase inhibitor called BMS-986094, was being tested in a phase II trial when the case of heart failure was identified. The trial was halted earlier this month.

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