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$1,000-a-pill Hepatitis drug in USA sells for less than $10 in Egypt

(NaturalNews) The financial raping of America by Big Pharma has just achieved a new milestone with the impending launch of a Hepatitis C drug that costs $1,000 a pill. If you've ever wondered why U.S. health care is so unaffordable and inaccessible -- and why health insurance costs are bankrupting businesses and municipalities across the nation -- this is exactly why. The same drug that sells for $1,000 a pill in the USA -- named "Sovaldi" -- sells for just $10 in Egypt, or 1/100th the USA price.

Archieved Broadcast of Lloyd on Freedomizer Radio

broadcast January 13 2014 on Freedomixer Radio

Special Guest, Lloyd Wright, author of “Triumph Over Hepatitis C,” exposes the adverse side affects of Rx drugs and the myriad of alternative natural supplements and share his story of how he helped heal himself on the JUSTICE CLUB with Host, Rose Colombo

skip to 70 minutes in to hear Lloyd

Widespread access to new HCV antivirals feasible within 15 years

Large-scale manufacturing of direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C is possible within the next 15 years, with a minimum target price of $100 to $250 for a 12-week treatment course, recent data suggest.

At that cost, widespread access to such treatments in low- and middle-income countries is a feasible goal, according to the research team from Liverpool University in the United Kingdom, Howard University in Washington, D.C., Imperial College London and University of Cape Town in South Africa.

Yet another vaccine researcher caught faking research

Yet another vaccine researcher has been caught faking research on a bogus AIDS vaccine, adding to the pattern of scientific fraud and criminality that characterizes the modern-day vaccine industry. Dr. Dong-Pyou Han from Iowa State University has resigned this week after admitting he spiked rabbit blood samples with healthy human blood to falsely show the presence of antibodies that would "prove" his AIDS vaccine worked.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) was so convinced by the fraud that they gave Han $19 million in research funding. The NIH later found the fraud after attempting to replicate Han's work and figuring out something was terribly wrong with the research.

Hepatitis C, a Silent Killer, Meets Its Match

Over the next three years, starting within the next few weeks, new drugs are expected to come to market that will cure most patients with the virus, in some cases with a once-a-day pill taken for as little as eight weeks, and with only minimal side effects.

That would be a vast improvement over current therapies, which cure about 70 percent of newly treated patients but require six to 12 months of injections that can bring horrible side effects.

Patient Dilemma: Treat Hepatitis C Now or Hold Out?

Being diagnosed with a potentially fatal disease usually triggers immediate treatment. But a growing number of people infected with hepatitis C are putting off therapy, choosing instead to roll the dice and wait for a new generation of drugs to become available.

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