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Hepatitis C Cure

Gilead’s New One Pill a Day Cure for Hepatitis C

By Lloyd Wright, NHC, Best Selling Author

Over the last 2 ½ years, I have had a handful of clients that were successful at getting into the Gilead Sciences phase 1, 2 and 3 trials for their new drug, Sofosbuvir, for the treatment of Hepatitis C.

Gilead Sofosbuvir At the same time I had numerous clients that were rejected for these same trials. After reviewing lab work sent to me by these people and having lengthy discussions on the phone with them, it appears that the trials were being manipulated. They chose the healthiest people for testing their drug, not just physically healthy but ones with the most positive attitudes. I suspected this all along and then on November 4, 2013, the New York Times published an article on the new drug and they wrote, in reference to the previous 100% cure pushed in 2011 with full page ads in the Los Angeles Times, constant advertising on KNX News radio, that this was a 100% cure, “There was a huge rush to treatment. But doctors now say that side effects were worse than expected, in part because the sickest patients had been excluded from the clinical trials of the drugs.” “A lot of that didn’t come to light until after the drugs were approved,” said Dr. Frain R. Edlin, an associate professor of public health and medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. “Then it turns out they were just horrible.”.  (1)

Hepatitis C Virus and Natural Compounds: a New Antiviral Approach?

Abstract

Hepatitis C is a major global health burden with an estimated 160 million infected individuals worldwide. This long-term disease evolves slowly, often leading to chronicity and potentially to liver failure. There is no anti-HCV vaccine, and, until recently, the only treatment available, based on pegylated interferon and ribavirin, was partially effective, and had considerable side effects.

Widespread access to new HCV antivirals feasible within 15 years

Large-scale manufacturing of direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C is possible within the next 15 years, with a minimum target price of $100 to $250 for a 12-week treatment course, recent data suggest.

At that cost, widespread access to such treatments in low- and middle-income countries is a feasible goal, according to the research team from Liverpool University in the United Kingdom, Howard University in Washington, D.C., Imperial College London and University of Cape Town in South Africa.

I'm scheduled to take the "next" new cure next spring, but, I'm not doing it.

From: John
Sent: Tuesday, December 03, 2013
To: LloydWright.org
Subject: hep c

Dear Lloyd
My name is John and I'm a 61 yr old male. I contracted Hep c from a transfusion when I was 17 yrs old. About fifteen years ago the disease started attacking my liver. I'm stage 4 cirrhosis and pretty sick. I've taken the "cure" twice now and have been a non-responder. Last summer I took the Insivic cocktail and after 10 weeks into the specified twelve week period I broke out into a rash that nearly killed me. I'm just now after a year feeling more normal, except for the pain and discomfort. I'm scheduled to take the "next" new cure next spring, but, I'm not doing it. I will never again take Interferon or any other chemical. I'm really angry about American medicine and the lack of common sense and compassion.

Hepatitis C, a Silent Killer, Meets Its Match

Over the next three years, starting within the next few weeks, new drugs are expected to come to market that will cure most patients with the virus, in some cases with a once-a-day pill taken for as little as eight weeks, and with only minimal side effects.

That would be a vast improvement over current therapies, which cure about 70 percent of newly treated patients but require six to 12 months of injections that can bring horrible side effects.

The "Cure" for Hepatitis C

Click to Watch It

Hepatitis C survivor Lloyd Wright discusses the several claims of cures for hepatitis c that have come along since 1995.

Lloyd will live on the radio (internet & real life)
May 26, 5-6pm Pacific Time

A Hepatitis C Cure

Once considered a chronic and often deadly disease, now doctors are using a powerful word to describe the results of a new treatment for Hepatitis C.

Dr. Donald Jensen, University of Chicago Medicine: “This is a curable disease.”

It is news University of Chicago Medicine’s Dr. Donald Jensen is happy to spread. For 25 years he’s treated patients with hepatitis c, a virus that attacks the liver and causes inflammation. Over time, tissue in the organ turns to scar, cirrhosis sets in.

Dr. Jensen: “It’s like marbling in beef. It’s throughout the liver.”

Patients can develop liver cancer. More commonly, they end up in liver failure and require a transplant. But many don’t realize they have the virus.

Dr. Jensen: “The most common symptom is fatigue, which is pretty common for all of us.”

Judy Palmer knew something was wrong six weeks after she received a blood transfusion due to complications following the birth of her daughter.

Judy Palmer: “I started turning jaundiced and having abdominal pain.”

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