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herbs

Mainstream Media's War on Supplements

Are you ready to make a doctors appointment to get a prescription for vitamins?

Health Canada approves dandelion extract trials in humans

Health Canada has approved early clinical trials of dandelion extract to see if it can be used to kill cancer.

The approval is for a phase one — or toxicology — trial. It will determine whether the body can tolerate the dandelion extract and, if it can, how much of the extract the human body can tolerate.

Phase one trials do not reveal whether the substance being tested has a medicinal effect.

Your Teas

From: Teja
Sent: Monday, November 12, 2012 7:55 PM
To: LloydWright
Subject: Teas

The teas are amazing! Thanks for introducing me to them. They are delicious! 

Four bitter herbs heal the liver, gall bladder, and other ailments

(NaturalNews) Certain bitter herbs are considered liver herbs because they stimulate, cleanse, and protect the liver and gall bladder. While Western palates are not fond of bitter tasting foods, they do stimulate and support digestion. German research shows that bitter tonic herbs stimulate bile and hydrochloric acid production. They stimulate nervous system and immune system function, as well as combat fatigue and exhaustion.

The FDA New Dietary Ingredients Guidance

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently commenced a new assault against the dietary supplement industry – one that could threaten the availability of supplements currently on the market and that will discourage manufacturers from innovating new and more beneficial products in the future. In July the agency issued a draft Guidance document which sets forth its current thinking concerning provisions of the law that dictate what ingredients can be included in dietary supplement products, and what information companies must submit to the FDA if they desire to market a supplement that contains a new dietary ingredient (i.e., one that was not sold prior to October 15, 1994).

The FDA’s draft Guidance ignores the intent of Congress by seeking to impose insurmountable obstacles to the introduction of new dietary ingredients and includes interpretations that will threaten the continued sale of supplements if even the most minute of changes are made. If the Guideline is finalized and enforced by the FDA it will go a long way towards establishing the agency’s long-standing goal of requiring pre-market approval for dietary supplements.

The following are a few highlights of the Guidance document:

FDA’s New Sneak Attack on Supplements

Just before the July 4 holiday weekend, hoping to limit media attention, the FDA dropped a bomb on dietary supplements. Don’t let them get away with it! A new Action Alert.

On July 1, the US Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidance for complying with the New Dietary Ingredient (NDI) notification protocols contained in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). Ever since DSHEA was enacted in 1994, supplement manufacturers have had very little guidance on what counts as an NDI and when or how to send an NDI notification. The government has arbitrarily ignored or enforced this section of DSHEA, doing as it liked, without spelling out the rules.

Why does this matter? Because when you hear New Dietary Ingredient (NDI), substitute “New Supplement” in your mind. What we are dealing with here is whether the supplement industry is allowed to innovate and create new supplements—and if so, under what rules.

Hundreds of herbal remedies now outlawed across Europe

(NaturalNews) Live in Europe? Get your herbs while they last. New rules put forth by the European Union (EU) will ban the sale of certain herbal remedies that have been used for centuries.

Traditional herbs such a St. John's Wort or Echinacea must now meet strict licensing guidelines in order to be sold, while other lesser-known herbs that haven't been "traditionally" used in the last 30 years won't even make the cut to reach consumer shelves. Only those products that have been "assessed" by the Medicine and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will be available for purchase. The real kicker? Even approved products will only be recommended for minor ailments such as the common cold, which means that product labeling may no longer be allowed to convey the potent health benefits of widely-used herbal remedies.

According the the EU, the laws were put in place to protect consumers from the "damaging" effects of traditional herbal remedies. The subtext of that statement, of course, is that herbal remedies can sometimes have dangerous interactions when taken with prescription drugs. Used alone, however, herbal supplements rarely pose a problem. With so many people taking prescription drugs, it's clear that the EU's move to ban herbal products is a monopolistic attack on the alternative health movement. While they can't admit the dangerous and deadly side effects of manufactured drugs, they can shift the blame to herbs.

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